for the love of good: if everything is awesome, nothing is awesome

For better or worse (I argue the latter), we’re smitten with sharing naught but the supposed awesome of every moment of our lives. Social media and digital news feeds are a barrage of best day / spouse / thing EVER proclamations. Despite my want to believe in the positive and great, I’m suspect of any projected image wherein each day is the best, every dinner the most amazing, and all wines are awesome.

The lens through which I view life is one of optimistic realism. On the balance of probabilities, I accept that a “best” of something will occasionally cross my path while a “good” representation is most likely to be the encounter – with “not so good” also an option. Popular expectation of how much fantastic we’ll experience is severely out of whack. Subsequently, we have assigned a new and lower value to good. Nothing stands out from a crowd if the average is set at awesome. When did good lose its charm?

our language

In October 2014 I visited the Clare region of Nova Scotia, where my Acadian family speaks a localized French as our first language. Listening to my relatives chatter in Acadian-ese is both confusing and comforting; the cadence of their speech carries as much emotional expression as their word choice and, in some cases, more – such as when an English word is spoken with the Acadian accent. Adjectives are appropriated and change with emphasis, while nouns gain and lose syllables at random. Hello changes to ‘ello and ‘allo!, eventually becoming ‘ah-lo?! when popping one’s head into a neighbour’s house for an unannounced visit.

DSC_0058
in awe of the atlantic: cause of countless shipwrecks with as many stories, and steps from my father’s childhood home

Among the many interesting discoveries in translating Acadian to English is a word used by my uncle with regularity: satisfied. From discussing his recent furnace replacement to sharing a favourite dining spot in Yarmouth, my uncle referred to being satisfied rather than stating he was happy (or happy with something). I’m paraphrasing, but a typical conversation involving his satisfaction would go like this:

Me: Did you like the clam chowder?

Uncle Anselme: I usually don’t order clam chowder, because I’m particular about clam chowder. But this was nice. I’m satisfied.

or this…

Me: How is your new furnace working?

Uncle Anselme: It’s more efficient than the last one and less noisy. I’d say I’m satisfied with my choice. 

We’ve come to accept happy as a new standard of moderate descriptor for satisfaction or acceptance, displacing where once we would have used good. My circle of friends, in casual discourse, would likely have said their clam chowder was good or that they were happy with their new furnace. Can a furnace make you happy? On a cold night, yes. In the quest for life happiness a furnace might rank slightly lower – that you are satisfied with its performance is a more appropriate statement. Chalk up a win for Acadian translation.

I became accustomed to my uncle’s satisfaction, and upon return to my home life I noticed its absence here. It was also more difficult to ignore the epic, awesome, and best that surrounded me.

the decline of our level of diction

Through the wonder of smartphones we have the world in our pockets – but instead of being inspired by this access to so much, we’re becoming lazy. Satisfied has been relegated to use in surveys, and not much else. Each year more words are accepted into the Oxford English Dictionary, yet we use fewer to describe our experiences and feelings. These best of / most awesome / epic days and events do us a disservice: not only do these descriptors set the bar unattainably high for daily living, we’re less likley to be curious about individual experiences because we anticipate those particular words will convey a larger picture – an understood, unspoken description. It’s a falsehood, and we erode our cultural wealth each time we make these simple statements.

Where packaged individualism is the new socially acceptable collective norm, we strive to show how individually normal we are by sharing our every awesome moment / meal / experience. Discovering the latest hot whatchamacallit can help your voice burn brightly in the new media spotlight; however, like a flare, its shine is short-lived. In this light, the new craft brewery making an epic IPA will briefly attract more attention than the new craft brewery making good beer. Is an IPA epic? Beowulf is epic. Homer is epic. An IPA is refreshing, citrus-y, and satisfying. Can a wine be awesome? A lightning storm is awesome. A volcano is awesome. A wine can be surprising, balanced, complex. I am satisfied with how it tastes.

for the love of good

I aspire to write well and have folks who read my writing think ‘that was good’. This is the benchmark I’ve assigned: good. It lives somewhere between a B- and B+, where a C is average and an A is exceptional. At times I’ll write something that resonates with a group of people, and occasionally a sentence is structured so beautifully I want to frame it. Those are rare exceptions, as are awesome and epic. I’m more concerned with whether someone will find their own level of enjoyment in something I’ve written about – like the aforementioned craft brewery’s IPA – than I am with the length of time the spotlight will be on what I’ve written.

I’ve fallen into the awesome/epic/best trap on more occasions that I care to admit: in bite-sized statements meant for snacking, rather than multi-courses intended for a little more digestion (such as this). We snack on information more frequently than we digest stories. Platforms like Twitter and Facebook support these habits. I am not immune, although I do try to remind myself of the need for digestion.

When in the shadow of awesome, good can’t seem to catch a break. But I love good. We tend to poke and prod a little further when we stumble upon good; we’re more curious about good’s context, and the associated package defies an easy dismissal. Good is layered. Good is sexy. Good isn’t competing for your attention, because it doesn’t have to.

In a world where everything is awesome, nothing is. Let’s try for good, so we can be in awe more often.

~ Jeannette

in awe of art and the artist who lived this life: the reconstructed home of Maud Lewis, celebrated folk artist who lived outside of Digby NS
in awe of the artist who lived this life: reconstructed home of Maud Lewis, celebrated folk artist who lived outside of Digby

get a job – in BC wine country

Okanagan Lavender & Herb Farm
Okanagan Lavender & Herb Farm, July 2014 – author photo

 

You’re so lucky to live in the Okanagan. I wish I could.

Guess what? You can.

In 2006, my fella and I decided to leave the big city. I was working in human resources at Vancity Credit Union and he was (still is) a merchandiser with Canadian Tire. Our combined income was probably what many expect a single person to live on in Vancouver. So when looking to purchase a home with a garage (my fella wanted the garage, not the home), we chose to move somewhere else. One year later we’d sold our condo, found jobs, and bought a home.

I miss Vancouver. I love the Okanagan. There’s nothing wrong with holding those sentiments simultaneously. Did I give up a skookum gig with an upward career trajectory? Yes. Are we living in the same fashion here? No. We could if we wanted, but we didn’t move to replicate our urban life. There I didn’t write. Here I do. That’s difference enough.

My first gig on moving to the Okanagan was in a winery tasting room. I washed and polished glassware, swept the floors, and cleaned the bathrooms. Daily cashout included sipping a glass of wine. In my second week I found a rattlesnake curled up behind the front tire of my car – so I lingered on the patio with another glass of wine.

When I was inevitably laid off at the end of the season I found a job, this time in an office for administrative-y type work. That kept me going while I finished university (I drove to Vancouver every other week for the first year we lived here, to complete my undergraduate degree) and while I stretched my writing wings until I could eventually dive into the unfamiliar world of freelance work.

The timeline: five years.

This time of year, many of my Okanagan business friends are hiring staff for the season. While I can’t help you make the decision to haul stakes and join us in the wilderness (the tasty, BC wine wilderness), I’m happy to share with you some of the awesome gigs available at lovely places where you could work with nice people.

Local Lounge * Grille (Summerland): Top of the food chain for service and quality, with a stellar new executive chef on board as of April. Relentless in their pursuit to deliver excellent customer service, this is an ideal environment to excel at over-delivering. Hiring for both front and back of house, email your resume to employment@thelocalgroup.ca.

Miradoro Restaurant (Oliver): Flawless dining experiences, for both service and cuisine. Restaurateur Manuel call-me-Manny Ferreira and executive chef Jeff van Geest bring their A-game to every day. They cultivate one of the most engaged and proud teams in hospitality. Hiring server, server assistants, and back of house, email resumes to info@miradoro.ca or stop by in person. (PS: Tinhorn Creek is also hiring in the wine shop, vineyard, and for grounds maintenance)

doLci Socialhouse (Osoyoos): A brunch/mid-afternoon/evening watering hole, frequented by locals and recently refitted from the former “doLci Deli”. Now with a focus on small plates, evening specials, and local beer/wine/spirits, doLci is the answer to the ongoing Okanagan question of what do we do in the evening?. Answer: hang out here. One more thing: house cured bacon. Now hiring servers and cooks, apply to lunch@dolcideli.com.

Wine Jobs: They’re everywhere right now. Search for a particular winery you’d like to work at and check for employment listings. Or, visit one of these aggregate sites:

  • Wine Plus+: MW Rhys Pender posts BC wine jobs shared with him
  • WineBC.org: the British Columbia Wine Institute posts BC wine jobs on behalf of member wineries
  • Wine Jobs Canada: MW James Cluer posts wine jobs from across Canada

The next time you think I’m lucky to live here, know that yes indeed I feel that I am – but I (and those living here) work very hard to stay here, so luck really has nothing to do with it.

~ Jeannette

BC Bubbles for NYE (and days beyond)

For much of the year, the sparkling wine shelf in our local liquor stores receives barely more than a cursory glance. During the holidays we’re expected to sidle up to 750ml of bubbly with ease and select the right fit for our evening of extravagance and decadence. No pressure, right?

Many of us have wine anxiety even when the stakes are lower and there’s less glitter involved. If it’s not a world we spend much time in, standing in front of an endless row of stylish labels with words like cava or methode traditionelle can easily make us feel overwhelmed.

Let’s simplify the playing field: when selecting a sparkling wine this year, choose one from BC. We have talented folks crafting delightful bubbles in our own backyard. Let’s celebrate with them.

Bella Ancentral 2014

Traditional Method (champagne-style)

Made in the method of sparklers from Champagne, these bubbles tend to be full-bodied with varying degree of dryness. Our BC winemakers can use different grapes than what’s permitted to make champagne in France (chardonnay, pinot noir, pinot meunier).

Bella Wines 2013 Sparkling Blanc de Blancs, Oliver West Side bone-dry (residual sugar: <3g/l), BC, $23.90

Arguably the first bubble house in the province (only producing sparkling wines), Bella is a study of place. Using chardonnay (for white) and gamay (for rosé), winemaker Jay Drysdale focuses on a single vineyard at a time. Best enjoyed with serious bubble lovers, and food – plenty of food.

Gray Monk 2012 Odyssey White Brut dry-fruity (residual sugar: 7.8g/l), BC/AB/+, $24.99 and up

The Heiss family established their winery in 1972, making them a cornerstone of our young industry. A blend of pinot blanc, chardonnay, and riesling, this brut is lovely combination of citrus and fruity notes that directs your palate toward sweet without oodles of sugar. Best enjoyed before a meal or with light appetizers.

Summerhill Cipes Brut NV off-dry (residual sugar: 11.2g/l), BC/AB/+, $26.95 and up

Any list of BC sparklers wouldn’t be complete without something from the folks who built a pyramid. A blend of riesling and chardonnay (with some pinot blanc), this wine is an example of winemaker Eric von Krosigk’s love for the bubble and sense of adventure. Versatile enough to enjoy before, during, or after a meal.

Sumac Ridge Stellar’s Jay 2008 off-dry (residual sugar: 11g/l), BC/AB/+, $24.99 and up

A staple in any BC bubbly lineup, Stellar’s Jay has a recognizable label and is a go-to choice for many. This blend of pinot noir, chardonnay, and pinot blanc is readily available outside of BC and within the province. Bright fruit gives a perception of sweet, but the medium body provides good weight. Easy sipping on its own, or with festive fare.

Prosecco/Frizzante/Charmat

Ranging from dry, to off-dry, to sweet. Without getting too technical and speaking largely in generalities, here’s a breakdown: prosecco is most often a dry sparkling wine (originally from Italy); frizzante is a generic term that refers to a lightly sparkling wine with less bubbles than traditional sparklers; charmat style wines get their fizz while in larger pressurized containers.

Orofino 2013 Muscato Frizzante dry/off-dry, BC, $25

This wine was crafted out of necessity: winery owners John and Virginia wanted something special to greet guests with at their annual 1.6 Mile Dinner. It’s a great welcome-to-the-party beverage, an ideal match for foods with a little heat, and can be sipped with ease well into the evening.

Stoneboat Vineyards Piano Brut NV dry/off-dry (residual sugar: 9.5g/l), BC/AB, $24.90+

The only wine in BC produced with charmat tanks (specially pressurized to add carbonation once the wine goes through fermentation), the prosecco-inspired Piano is made from pinot blanc and muller thurgau. If someone could bottle summer, this would be it. Think back to days spent lakeside with the sun on your face and laughter in the air.

Cheers,

~ Jeannette

S and R 05