what’s in a name: designated viticultural areas

a golden view from Road 13 Vineyards, one of the wineries included in the proposed Golden Mile sub-appellation.

By international wine growing region standards, the Okanagan is young. This can be both a challenge and an opportunity: it’s not easy to be taken seriously, but it allows for a more generous playing field on which to innovate and invent. Yet to name the Okanagan as one region is misleading, particularly when there are such marked differences in soil and climate from tip (north Kelowna) to tail (south Osoyoos).

Enter designated viticultural areas, or DVAs; areas designated by distinguishable geographic features. At present, the entire Okanagan Valley is one big DVA. There has been increased chatter among wine-types about whether lumping all smaller growing regions into one large DVA does good service to consumer education, the growth of our wine industry, and accurate labelling.

In the current Okanagan Valley DVA, all wineries fall under the one big umbrella. Smaller producers and those with a site-specific focus aren’t permitted to list a sub-region on the label; if you grow in Okanagan Falls, you can’t label your region as such on the bottle. To include these areas (sub-regions) on the label, one would need to designate sub-appellations within the designated viticultural area. Europe has them, and California and Washington do too.

For those wineries in the pro-sub-appellation camp, having one big DVA can be restrictive for marketing/labelling in a way that will truly reflect their brand. It can also be somewhat misleading to consumers drinking a bottle of wine from what we think is one area of the Okanagan Valley but which is, in actuality, made from grapes grown in another. For example, most hearty red wines are ripened further south in the Okanagan DVA. How it happens isn’t a mystery – it’s a combination of climate, degree days, and terroir.

The following press release was issued today by Hawksworth Communications, announcing the first proposed sub-appellation in the Okanagan Valley DVA: The Golden Mile Bench.

This is a substantial step forward in our young wine industry.

~ Jeannette

For Immediate Release

Golden Mile Bench Proposes to become Okanagan Valley’s First Sub-Appellation

Oliver, BC (May 21, 2014) – Wineries located on the Golden Mile Bench wine growing area near Oliver in British Columbia have submitted a proposal to become the first official sub-DVA “Designated Viticultural Area” of the Okanagan Valley DVA. An in-depth scientific analysis by scientists from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre – Summerland (AAFC-PARC Summerland) has shown the area has a combination of landform, landscape position, mesoclimate, air drainage and soil materials that make it distinct within the Okanagan Valley, contributing to the production of unique wines.

A group of producers in the area have been exploring the concept of proposing a Golden Mile Bench DVA since 2009. After much discussion, debate and an in-depth study of the region’s terroir by Scott Smith, M.Sc. Soil Scientist with AAFC-PARC Summerland in conjunction with Dr. Pat Bowen, Ph.D. Research Scientist, Viticulture and Plant Physiology also at AAFC-PARC Summerland, the final boundaries were decided. Wine consultant, Rhys Pender MW of Wine Plus+ helped to compile the proposal.

With the Okanagan Valley DVA comprising around four-fifths of all British Columbia’s vineyard area, yet producing wines from many different mesoclimates and terroirs, it is a widely held belief that there is a need to break this large, single appellation into meaningful, scientifically unique sub-DVAs that produce distinctive wines. Golden Mile Bench is the first such application to the BC Wine Authority.

The proposal was submitted to the BC Wine Authority (BCWA) on May 20th. The BCWA will conduct consultations within the region and a vote by ballot amongst the relevant stakeholders within the proposed region’s boundaries. Once the due diligence has been completed and assuming the BCWA determines that all requirements have been met, it will then submit the proposal to the Minister of Agriculture for approval.

Any enquiries about the status of the proposal should be directed to the BC Wine Authority (http://www.bcvqa.ca).

A question and answer section with more details is included below.

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Questions & Answers:

When will the Golden Mile Bench DVA become official?
The proposal has been submitted to the BC Wine Authority who conduct the process as laid out in the Wines of Marked Quality Regulation. Assuming the Authority determines that the requirements of the Regulation are met, it will then submit the proposal to the Minister of Agriculture for approval. There is currently no existing time estimate.

Who conducted the scientific study to determine the proposed boundaries?
The boundaries were decided after in-depth analysis by Scott Smith, a soil scientist with the Pacific Agri – Food Research Centre (PARC) in Summerland in conjunction with Dr. Pat Bowen, a Viticulture Research Scientist also at PARC.

Will some vineyards or wineries be excluded from the new DVA?
As required under the Regulation, the area of the proposed DVA has been drawn up using a scientific basis. Some producers in the area have vineyards both in and out of the proposed DVA and some vineyards are even cut into two by the boundaries. Also, any winery who buys grapes from within the proposed DVA can use those grapes to make a Golden Mile Bench DVA designation.

Will there be more sub-DVAs created in the near future?
All those involved hope that this will be the start of creating a number of scientifically defined unique sub-DVAs that help tell the story of the unique regions of the Okanagan Valley.

What does a sub-DVA mean and how will it appear on labels?
When a sub-DVA is created, it applies to all of the vineyards within the defined boundaries. Any winery (not just those located in the sub-DVA) making wine from grapes grown within the sub-DVA could use the name “Golden Mile Bench” as an appellation of origin on the label of that particular wine.

Winery Contacts 
CC Jentsch Cellars – Chris Jentsch / jentsch@eastlink.ca
CheckMate Artisanal Winery – David Wilson / dwilson@markanthony.com
Culmina Family Estate Winery – Donald Triggs / donald.triggs@culmina.ca
Fairview Cellars – Bill Eggert / beggert@img.net
Gehringer Brothers – Walter Gehringer / w.gehringer@telus.net
Hester Creek – Mark Sheridan / mark@hestercreek.com
Inniskillin Okanagan – Josie Tyabji / josie.tyabji@cbrands.com
Golden Mile Cellars Inc. (Road 13 Vineyards) – Pam Luckhurst / pam@road13vineyards.com
Rustico Farm and Cellars Ltd. – Bruce Fuller / bfuller@rusticowinery.com
Tinhorn Creek Vineyards – Sandra Oldfield / sandra@tinhorn.com